Now Showing 2016 Primary School Results

The Department of Education have just released 2016 primary school results.
We're now showing these latest figures for all primary schools in England.

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Inspection and Exam Results Explained

Grade 1 : Outstanding
An outstanding school is highly effective in delivering outcomes that provide exceptionally well for all its pupils’ needs. This ensures that pupils are very well equipped for the next stage of their education, training or employment.
Grade 2 : Good
A good school is effective in delivering outcomes that provide well for all its pupils’ needs. Pupils are well prepared for the next stage of their education, training or employment.
Grade 3 : Requires improvement
A school that requires improvement is not yet a good school, but it is not inadequate. This school will receive a full inspection within 24 months from the date of this inspection.
Grade 4 : Inadequate
A school that has serious weaknesses is inadequate overall and requires significant improvement but leadership and management are judged to be Grade 3 or better. This school will receive regular monitoring by Ofsted inspectors. A school that requires special measures is one where the school is failing to give its pupils an acceptable standard of education and the school’s leaders, managers or governors have not demonstrated that they have the capacity to secure the necessary improvement in the school. This school will receive regular monitoring by Ofsted inspectors.

Key Stage 2 performance (2016)

Key Stage 2 covers pupils aged 7 to 11. The key measures available this year are:

Percentage of pupils meeting the expected standard in reading, writing and maths
Pupils are ‘meeting the expected standard’ if they achieve a ‘scaled score’ of 100 or more in their reading and maths tests, and their teacher assesses them as ‘working at the expected standard’ or better in writing.
Percentage of pupils achieving at a higher standard in reading, writing and maths
Pupils are ‘achieving at a higher standard’ if they achieve a ‘scaled score’ of 110 or more in their reading and maths tests, and their teacher assesses them as ‘working at a greater depth within the expected standard’ in writing. This standard was set for the first time in 2016 by the Department for Education to provide information about pupils across England achieving in the top 5%.
Average score in reading
This score is known as the reading ‘scaled score’. The score is an average for pupils in the school. The expected standard is a score of 100 or more. The higher standard is 110 or more.
Average score in maths

This score is known as the maths ‘scaled score’. The score is an average for pupils in the school. The expected standard is a score of 100 or more. The higher standard is 110 or more

Progress in reading, writing and maths

The scores are calculated by comparing the key stage 2 test and assessment results of pupils at this school with the results of pupils in schools across England who started with similar assessment results at the end of the previous key stage – key stage 1.

A score above zero means pupils made more progress, on average, than pupils across England who got similar results at the end of key stage 1.

A score below zero means pupils made less progress, on average, than pupils across England who got similar results at the end of key stage 1.

A negative progress score does not mean pupils made no progress, or the school has failed, rather it means pupils in the school made less progress than other pupils across England with similar results at the end of key stage 1.

The majority of schools have progress scores between -5 and +5.

It is difficult to say with certainty how much the progress scores are down to the school (which may have scored higher with a different group of pupils) and how much is down to the pupils (for example some may have performed well at any school). The Department of Education publishes confidence intervals to reflect this uncertainty. We do not show confidence intervals on this site. To see them click the link titled "Full exam performance data and other useful information" under the schools Key Stage 2 results.

For a more detailed explanation, see scaled scores at key stage 2, key stage 2 teacher assessment and primary school accountability.

Key Stage 2 performance (pre 2016)

Key Stage 2 covers pupils aged 7 to 11.  The majority of pupils are expected to achieve Level 4 in Key Stage 2 National Curriculum Tests in both English and Maths. The 'Percentage of pupils achieving expected Key Stage 2' performance measure shows the percentage of pupils eligible to sit tests who have achieved Level 4 or above. A year on year comparison enables readers to see whether a school’s performance has remained consistent or improved over time.

The 'Key Stage 2 average point score per pupil' performance measure shows the total number of points achieved in each subject by all eligible pupils, divided by the number of eligible pupils. This is often used in league tables to rank schools by performance. The ranking shown next to this figure in our school markers is calculated by us, based upon published Key Stage 2 results.

The average point score that a child is expected to get at the end of year 6 (KS2) is 27 points. This equates to a 4b which is the national expected level. Level 5, above national expectation, starts at 5c or 31 points. The higher the point score the higher the children's attainment. Below is a mapping of point scores to levels.

Level Point Score Description
3a 23 Below average
4c 25 About average
4b 27 About average
4a 29 Above national average
5c 31 Above national average
5b 33 Well above national average
5a 35 Well above national average
6c 37 Exceptional
6b 39 Exceptional

2012 is the first time that level 6 tests have been used for Maths and English.

The 'Key Stage 2 average point score per pupil' is a much more granular measure of attainment than the 'Percentage of pupils achieving expected Key Stage 2' because is shows how far above average pupils are, for example a school could have 100% of pupils achieving Level 4 or above but that does not tell you if all pupils are just Level 4 or in fact higher. 'Key Stage 2 average point score per pupil' helps you to identify just how well the pupils are doing, e.g. if the APS is 25-27 then most of the pupils are about average, if the APS is 33-34 then most of the pupils are well above the national average. However, in both cases the 'Percentage of pupils achieving expected Key Stage 2' could be 100%, but clearly the school with the higher APS is better.

Click a school marker and then click the exam results link to see the school's full exam data. For more information click here.

Key Stage 4 performance: GCSE (and equivalent) performance

Key Stage 4 covers pupils aged 14 to 16.  The 'Percentage of pupils achieving 5+ A*-C grade GCSEs (or equivalent)' performance measure shows the percentage of students who achieved five or more GCSEs (or equivalent) each with a grade between A* and C (or equivalent) including English and Maths. A year on year comparison enables readers to see whether a school’s performance has remained consistent or improved over time.

The 'KS 4 average point score per pupil (best 8) - all qualifications' performance measure shows the average number of points achieved per pupil across their best 8 qualifications. This is often used in league tables to rank schools by performance. The ranking shown next to this figure in our school markers is calculated by us, based upon published Key Stage 4 results.

Click a school marker and then click the exam results link to see the school's full exam data. For more information click here.

Key Stage 5 performance: A-Level (and equivalent) performance

Key Stage 5 covers pupils aged 17 to 18.  The 'Percentage of pupils achieving 3 or more A-levels or equivalent' performance measure shows the percentage of students achieving 3 or more A levels (or equivalent) at grades A*-E (or equivalent). A year on year comparison for this data is not available, however the average point score below can be used to compare performance over time. For more information click here.

The 'KS 5 average point score per pupil' provides a measure of the average number of A level equivalent qualifications studied by students at a school or college and the grades they achieved. The more qualifications undertaken by students and the higher the grades they achieved, the higher the average point score per student. A year on year comparison enables readers to see whether a school’s performance has remained consistent or improved over time. This is often used in league tables to rank schools by performance. The ranking shown next to this figure in our school markers is calculated by us, based upon published Key Stage 5 results. For more information click here.

Click a school marker and then click the exam results link to see the school's full exam data.

Top 10% (England only)

Star performing school Top 10% schools are schools that are ranked within the top 10% of all English schools, based upon their pupils' average point scores, which are a key measure of a pupil's attainment (see above for further details about average point scores). There are approximately 20,000 schools that teach at primary level, hence there are approximately 2,000 primary schools marked with a star. There are approximately 6,000 schools that teach at secondary level, hence there are approximately 600 secondary schools marked with a star. A secondary school can be marked with a star because of either its GCSE results or A-Level results. Below is a list of the point scores used to identify the top 10% schools:

  • Key Stage 2: Average point score.
  • Key Stage 4 (GCSE and equivalent): Average (capped) point score per student; capped because it only considers the student's best 8 exam results.
  • Key Stage 5 (A-Level and equivalent): Average point score per student (including equivalences).