Bamber Bridge St Aidan’s Church of England Primary School

About Bamber Bridge St Aidan’s Church of England Primary School Browse Features

Bamber Bridge St Aidan’s Church of England Primary School


Name Bamber Bridge St Aidan’s Church of England Primary School
Website http://www.staidansprimaryschool.co.uk
Ofsted Inspection Rating Good
Inspection Date 19 January 2016
Address Larch Grove, Bamber Bridge, Preston, Lancashire, PR5 6GX
Phone Number 01772337321
Type Primary
Age Range 5-11
Religious Character Church of England
Gender Mixed
Number of Pupils 128 (50% boys 50% girls)
Number of Pupils per Teacher 18.3
Local Authority Lancashire
Percentage Free School Meals 30.5%
Percentage English is Not First Language 1.6%
Persisitent Absence 15.7%
Pupils with SEN Support 20.3%
Catchment Area Information Available Yes, our catchment area data is FREE
Last Distance Offered Information Available No

Information about this school

This is a well below average-sized primary school. The proportion of disabled pupils and those who have special educational needs is well above average. The proportion of disadvantaged pupils supported by pupil premium funding is more than twice the national average. The pupil premium is additional government funding to support those pupils who are known to be eligible for free school meals and those who are looked after by the local authority. Almost all pupils are of White British heritage. Children attend the Reception class on a full-time basis. The school meets the government’s current floor standards, which are the minimum expectations for pupils’ attainment and progress in reading, writing and mathematics by the end of Year 6. Since the previous inspection there have been a number of appointments, including a new headteacher, and a newly qualified teacher. Several governors, including a new Chair of the Governing Body, have been appointed. Various building work has taken place, resulting in a new reception area, office space, a classroom and a multi-sensory room. A before-school club is based on the site. This is subject to a separate inspection. The school experiences high levels of pupil mobility throughout the year.

Summary of key findings for parents and pupils

This is a good school This is a rapidly improving school which is led by a well-organised headteacher who leaves nothing to chance. Together with the assistant headteacher and a rejuvenated governing body, she has ensured that the school has gone from strength to strength. Good leadership, and close partnership with the church and community, have ensured that pupils’ achievement and the quality of teaching has improved since the previous inspection. The quality of teaching, learning and assessment is good. Teachers and teaching assistants work very well together to make learning both interesting and memorable. All aspects of the early years provision are good. Children are highly curious, sociable, and keen to share and talk about their learning. Pupils say that they always feel safe and well looked after. They attend school regularly and have very positive attitudes to their learning. Pupils have a good appreciation of British values. They are fair and considerate, and know that with their rights come responsibilities. All groups of pupils, including the disadvantaged and those with disabilities or special educational needs, make good progress. At the end of Year 6 in 2015 pupils made outstanding progress in reading and writing. The vast majority of parents are very positive about the school. They say that they are well informed and happy with their children’s progress. Excellent use of primary school sports funding has helped to ensure that this is an award-winning school in a number of areas of sport. Governors know the school very well and are fully involved in school life. They support and challenge school leaders in equal measure. It is not yet an outstanding school because : Too few opportunities are available for pupils to practise and refine their writing skills, particularly in subjects other than English. Teaching does not always ensure that the most- and the least-able pupils make the best possible progress.