Cansfield High School


Name Cansfield High School
Website http://www.cansfield.wigan.sch.uk
Ofsted Inspection Rating Good
Inspection Date 23 January 2019
Address Old Road, Ashton-in-Makerfield, Wigan, Lancashire, WN4 9TP
Phone Number 01942727391
Type Secondary
Age Range 11-16
Religious Character Does not apply
Gender Mixed
Number of Pupils 960 (50% boys 50% girls)
Number of Pupils per Teacher 16.5
Local Authority Wigan
Percentage Free School Meals 16.9%
Percentage English is Not First Language 1.6%
Persisitent Absence 11%
Pupils with SEN Support 10.5%
Catchment Area Information Available Yes, our catchment area data is FREE
Last Distance Offered Information Available No

Information about this school

Cansfield High School is an average-sized secondary school. The majority of pupils are of white British heritage. The proportion of pupils from minority ethnic groups is lower than the national average and very few pupils are identified as speaking English as an additional language. The proportion of pupils supported by pupil premium funding is average. The proportion of pupils who receive support for SEND is broadly average when compared with the national figure. A very small number of pupils have an education, health and care plan. Since the previous inspection, there have been significant changes to leadership. This includes the appointment of a new headteacher from April 2018 and the subsequent reduction and restructure of the senior leadership team, and changes to other leaders in the school. The school uses no off-site alternative provision.

Summary of key findings for parents and pupils

This is a good school Since starting in post, the headteacher has carried out a ‘root and branch’ overhaul of the school to set it back on track. As a result, the school is improving rapidly, even though many leaders have only been in post a short time. Leaders are committed to making this school a beacon of excellence for the community. They work together as a united team. Leaders, including governors, have an accurate knowledge of the strengths of the school and know the challenges ahead as they work to improve outcomes for all pupils. Staff morale is high because of the excellent support they receive from leaders. Teaching is improving because teachers receive high-quality training. Teachers feel valued because they are encouraged to share their practice with others as they develop their skills. Leaders are improving the curriculum to better meet the needs of pupils wanting to specialise in languages and humanities, or to study a range of vocational and academic courses. Staff, pupils, parents and carers are unanimous in their views that behaviour is good throughout the school. Pupils are proud of their school and show respect to each other and to adults. Pupils are well cared for, but some do not know enough about other faiths and cultures to be fully prepared for life in modern Britain. Attendance is improving because pupils enjoy school more than in the past. Disadvantaged pupils and pupils with special educational needs and/or disabilities (SEND) do not attend school as regularly as their peers, although this is improving. Outcomes require improvement because : results, although improving, are not securely good. Some groups of pupils struggle to overcome a legacy of underachievement from the past. Teachers plan activities to engage and challenge pupils. As a result, progress for the most able is improving and there is now very little difference between the progress of boys and girls. Differences remain in the performance of disadvantaged pupils currently in the school compared with their peers, although this is reducing. Progress in mathematics is improving but lags behind the stronger progress seen in other subjects. Some pupils in Years 7 and 8 miss out on opportunities to practise their mathematical fluency, reasoning and problem-solving skills. Although the weakest readers receive highly effective support to improve their reading, a culture of reading across the school is missing.