Jesson’s CofE Primary School (VA)


Name Jesson’s CofE Primary School (VA)
Website http://www.jessons.dudley.sch.uk/
Ofsted Inspection Rating Requires improvement
Inspection Date 30 April 2019
Address School Street, Dudley, West Midlands, DY1 2AQ
Phone Number 01384816825
Type Primary
Age Range 3-11
Religious Character Church of England
Gender Mixed
Number of Pupils 628 (52% boys 48% girls)
Number of Pupils per Teacher 19.6
Percentage Free School Meals 17%
Percentage English is Not First Language 44.7%

Information about this school

The school is much larger than the average-sized primary school. There are three classes per year group from Reception to Year 6. A section 48 inspection to evaluate the distinctiveness and effectiveness of Jesson’s CofE Primary (VA) as a Church of England school took place in March 2015. Nursery children attend school on a part-time or a full-time basis from the age of three years. Children in Reception attend full time. The headteacher has been in post since January 2015. The school’s senior leadership team has recently been expanded and now includes the headteacher, a deputy headteacher and three assistant headteachers. Pupils are from a wide range of ethnic backgrounds. Around half of the pupils speak English as an additional language, although only a small proportion of pupils are at an early stage of learning to speak English. The school has a higher than average proportion of pupils who receive support for SEND. The proportion of pupils who have an education, health and care plan is above the national average. The proportion of pupils known to be eligible for the pupil premium is a little lower than that found nationally. A small number of pupils attend the Intensive Learning Unit for two sessions per week. This provision is run by Dudley Learning Support Service. The school offers a breakfast club and an after-school club. The local governing body manages this provision.

Summary of key findings for parents and pupils

This is a school that requires improvement The school has been through a period of disrupted leadership. As a result, leaders and governors have not maintained the standards of education that were in place at the time of the last inspection. In recent years, not all leaders’ and teachers’ expectations of what pupils can achieve have been high enough, especially for those who are vulnerable. Consequently, too few pupils achieve the standards expected for their age, especially at the end of early years and key stage 2. The support provided by some teaching assistants is not as effective as it could be. Pupils are not always moved on in their learning. The quality of teaching is inconsistent, including in the early years. Some lessons are not well matched to pupils’ needs, or pupils may not take a full part in lessons. When this happens, it slows the progress that they make. Pupil premium funding has not been used well to improve outcomes for disadvantaged pupils. Pupils do not have enough opportunities to apply their learning independently. The curriculum is broad and balanced. However, teachers’ expectations of what pupils can achieve are not equally high in each subject and across each year group. Assessment and monitoring systems do not yet fully support leaders and governors in monitoring pupils’ progress effectively. The school has the following strengths The headteacher, supported by governors, has taken decisive action to strengthen the school’s leadership. Governors and leaders are fully aware of the areas requiring improvement. They are now taking effective action to address these. Pupils’ behaviour is well managed and there are effective systems in place for pupils who need additional support. Effective approaches to teaching phonics, reading and writing have been developed, including additional resources and staff training. As a result, pupils’ attainment is starting to improve. Most pupils enjoy coming to school. They are polite, happy and keen to learn. Pupils are very well cared for. Pastoral support for pupils and their families is strong.