Kingswinford Academy


Name Kingswinford Academy
Website http://www.kingswinford.windsoracademytrust.org.uk
Ofsted Inspection Rating Good
Inspection Date 15 July 2015
Address Water Street, Kingswinford, West Midlands, DY6 7AD
Phone Number 01384296596
Type Academy
Age Range 11-16
Religious Character None
Gender Mixed
Number of Pupils 914 (49% boys 51% girls)
Number of Pupils per Teacher 17.4
Academy Sponsor Windsor Academy Trust
Percentage Free School Meals 9%
Percentage English is Not First Language 5%

Information about this school

The school is an average-sized secondary school. The proportion of students who are from minority ethnic backgrounds is below average, and very few speak English as an additional language. The proportion of disabled students and those who have special educational needs is above average. The proportion of students supported through the pupil premium, which provides additional funding for looked-after children and those known to be eligible for free school meals, is below average. Full-time and part-time off-site alternative courses are currently provided for 17 students in Years 7 to 11 at Stourbridge College and through the Impact, Black Country and Cherry Tree Centres. The school meets the government’s current floor standards, which set the minimum expectations for students’ attainment and progress in English and mathematics by the end of Year 11. The school has undergone some turnover in staffing over the past two years, particularly in the English and mathematics departments. The school’s science department has an observatory, which provides outreach support for students from local primary schools. The school has received the ‘Gold Standard Award’ in recognition of the quality of its careers advice.

Summary of key findings for parents and pupils

This is a good school. Standards are consistently above average and students make good progress, including in English and mathematics. The quality of teaching is good. Students say how much they value the extra support that teachers provide if they are having difficulty. Relationships between students and staff are warm and supportive. Students are keen to learn. They behave well, show enthusiasm in their lessons and are keen to contribute their ideas in class. Behaviour around the school is calm and sensible. Students are polite and courteous to adults and get on well together. The school ensures students are kept very safe. Students are very well informed about the potential dangers of modern life, so know how to keep themselves safe. Students value opportunities to take responsibility, for example, as prefects and anti-bullying ambassadors. They show great care for each other, saying that they would quickly take action to prevent any discrimination. The inspirational headteacher, well supported by the senior team and by the governing body, robustly drives improvement in teaching and achievement. Leaders have been relentless in their drive to tackle any underperformance in teaching and to eliminate inadequate practice. The curriculum is good, offering a wealth of opportunities to support students’ good spiritual, moral, social and cultural development and understanding of British values. The use of alternative provision for those at risk of exclusion is very effective and enables these students to achieve well. It is not yet an outstanding school because : A minority of teachers, particularly in mathematics, do not always set tasks that stretch the most-able students or sufficiently support disadvantaged students and the least able. As a result, some students find tasks too easy, while for others they are too difficult. Although the quality of marking and feedback is generally good, a minority of teachers are not sufficiently specific about what students need to do to improve their work and to reach their targets.