Marshalls Park Academy


Name Marshalls Park Academy
Website http://marshallspark.org.uk/
Ofsted Inspection Rating Requires improvement
Inspection Date 15 March 2016
Address Pettits Lane, Romford, Essex, RM1 4EH
Phone Number 01708724134
Type Academy
Age Range 11-16
Religious Character Does Not Apply
Gender Mixed
Number of Pupils 855 (53% boys 47% girls)
Number of Pupils per Teacher 14.8
Academy Sponsor South West Essex Community Education Trust Limited
Percentage Free School Meals 10.9%
Percentage English is Not First Language 10.6%

information about the progress of disadvantaged

pupils to guide their use of additional pupil premium funding. Therefore, spending has been very general and there has not been sufficient analysis of its impact. Opportunities for teachers to develop their skills and experience have been limited by a lack of training and reflection. The governing body has not held leaders to account sufficiently well. They have not challenged inaccuracies in tracking and predicting pupil outcomes. This has contributed to the poor progress since the last inspection. The school has the following strengths The new headteacher understands the school’s weaknesses and has a clear strategy for improvement. Changes to the structure of the governing body mean that it is now well placed to support the headteacher with bringing about rapid change. The quality of careers information, advice and guidance is good. All pupils move on to sixth form, colleges or training with the support of the school. Middle leaders are keen to move the school forward. They have begun to share good practice and introduce changes to tackle poor rates of progress. Pupils are polite, courteous and respectful to each other and adults. They are proud to be part of the school. In corridors and at break and lunchtimes they work as an orderly, collegiate community. Pupils feel safe at school. Adults listen to their views and take them into account. Full report

Summary of key findings for parents and pupils

This is a school that requires improvement Areas of responsibility are poorly defined for the senior leaders and, consequently, there has been a lack of accountability and improvement since the last inspection. Teaching is not good enough in some subject areas and so pupils do not have the opportunity to achieve highly in all areas of their education. Assessments and the use of information have lacked rigour and accuracy, at an individual pupil level and in the analysis of groups. As a result, not all pupils make good progress from their starting points. The curriculum lacks oversight and planning, both in the examination courses offered and the development of broader knowledge, understanding and skills. Leaders have not collected and interrogated information about the progress of disadvantaged pupils to guide their use of additional pupil premium funding. Therefore, spending has been very general and there has not been sufficient analysis of its impact. Opportunities for teachers to develop their skills and experience have been limited by a lack of training and reflection. The governing body has not held leaders to account sufficiently well. They have not challenged inaccuracies in tracking and predicting pupil outcomes. This has contributed to the poor progress since the last inspection. The school has the following strengths The new headteacher understands the school’s weaknesses and has a clear strategy for improvement. Changes to the structure of the governing body mean that it is now well placed to support the headteacher with bringing about rapid change. The quality of careers information, advice and guidance is good. All pupils move on to sixth form, colleges or training with the support of the school. Middle leaders are keen to move the school forward. They have begun to share good practice and introduce changes to tackle poor rates of progress. Pupils are polite, courteous and respectful to each other and adults. They are proud to be part of the school. In corridors and at break and lunchtimes they work as an orderly, collegiate community. Pupils feel safe at school. Adults listen to their views and take them into account.