Queen Elizabeth’s


Name Queen Elizabeth’s
Website http://www.qe.devon.sch.uk
Ofsted Inspection Rating Requires improvement
Inspection Date 13 June 2018
Address Western Road, Crediton, Devon, EX17 3LU
Phone Number 01363773401
Type Academy
Age Range 11-18
Religious Character Does Not Apply
Gender Mixed
Number of Pupils 1340 (47% boys 53% girls)
Number of Pupils per Teacher 17.9
Percentage Free School Meals 6.5%
Percentage English is Not First Language 5.6%

Information about this school

The chair of the governing body was appointed in September 2017. The governing body has been restructured, and several new governors have joined this year. The principal was appointed in 2014. Several new senior leaders have been appointed in recent years. The school is larger than the average-sized secondary school. The school operates on two sites that are one mile apart. Pupils in Years 7 and 8 are taught at the Barnfield site. Pupils in Years 9 to 13 are taught at the Western Road site. The school provides boarding facilities for 48 pupils in three boarding houses on the Western Road site. The previous inspection of the boarding provision took place in November 2015, when the provision was judged to be good. The overall proportion of pupils who have SEN and/or disabilities is below average. However, the proportion of pupils supported with an education, health and care plan is above average. The school provides a specialist resource for pupils who have specific learning difficulties. Currently, there are six pupils using this resource. The proportion of pupils who are supported through pupil premium funding is below average. Almost all pupils are of White British heritage. A very small number of pupils attend alternative provision at Running Deer School. The school meets the government’s current floor standards, which are the minimum expectations for pupils’ attainment and progress by the end of Year 11.

Summary of key findings for parents and pupils

This is a school that requires improvement The overall effectiveness of the school and the boarding provision has declined since the previous inspection. Until recently, senior leaders have been too slow to react to the underperformance of key groups of pupils. Senior leaders’ oversight of procedures to keep pupils safe is not as rigorous in the boarding provision as it is in the main school. Although disadvantaged pupils’ progress in English and mathematics is in line with that of other pupils nationally, these pupils do not make sufficient progress in other subjects. Pupils who have special educational needs (SEN) and/or disabilities do not make sufficient progress from their starting points. Teaching does not help the least able pupils to develop their literacy skills and so these pupils make less progress than others across a range of subjects. Many parents believe the school does not communicate effectively with them and does Pupils’ behaviour requires improvement because a minority of pupils do not concentrate well in lessons. Staff in the school and the boarding provision do not use the school’s behaviour policy robustly. Pupils’ rate of attendance is too low. Too many pupils are persistently absent from school. Some pupils do not take pride in their work. This results in poorly presented or incomplete written work, particularly for boys. Senior leaders do not evaluate the impact of the school’s use of pupil premium funding in enough detail. Middle leaders have not secured consistently good teaching in their departments. Ineffective teaching has not been tackled quickly enough. In the past, governors have not challenged senior leaders effectively over the performance of the school. not take sufficient note of their views. The school has the following strengths The leadership of teaching has become more effective in the past year. Teachers are being given a clear vision for the future. Students in the sixth form on academic programmes make strong progress from their starting points. The curriculum offers pupils an appropriate range of academic and vocational options. The governing body has improved its ability to hold senior leaders to account. Boarders have positive experiences; they make new friends and many develop their language skills well. Compliance with national minimum standards for boarding schools The school must take action to meet the requirements of the national minimum standards for boarding schools and associated requirements. The details are listed in the full report.