Queensway Primary School


Name Queensway Primary School
Website http://www.queenswayschool.co.uk
Ofsted Inspection Rating Good
Inspection Date 26 June 2012
Address Coppice Wood Avenue, Yeadon, Leeds, West Yorkshire, LS19 7LF
Phone Number 01943874925
Type Primary
Age Range 3-11
Religious Character Does Not Apply
Gender Mixed
Number of Pupils 222 (49% boys 51% girls)
Number of Pupils per Teacher 15.3
Percentage Free School Meals 19.6%
Percentage English is Not First Language 7.7%

Information about the school

This is an average-sized primary school. The proportion of pupils from minority ethnic groups is well below average and the number of children who speak English as an additional language is very small. The proportion of pupils known to be eligible for free school meals is average, as is the proportion who are supported by school action plus or with a statement of special educational needs. The school meets the current floor standard, which sets the governments’ minimum expectations for attainment and progress. The school has Artsmark and Active School award and has gained the Stephen Lawrence Standard. The current headteacher has been seconded to work for the local authority. As a result, the deputy headteacher is currently the acting headteacher. Inspection grades: 1 is outstanding, 2 is good, 3 is satisfactory and 4 is inadequate Please turn to the glossary for a description of the grades and inspection terms

Key Findings

This is a good school. It is not yet outstanding because, although most teaching is good and leads to pupils’ overall good performance, some satisfactory teaching remains and, where this occurs, progress slows. Most pupils make good progress from starting points that are below those expected for their age. Progress in reading, writing and mathematics is mostly good as pupils move through Years 1 to 6. As a result, attainment by the end of Key Stage 2 is average. Teaching is good overall. In almost all lessons, teachers demonstrate secure subject knowledge, often through lively and enthusiastic presentations which provide a successful platform for effective learning. In a small number of satisfactory lessons, there are shortcomings. For example, time for pupils’ independent work is restricted and work is not always at the right level of challenge, which slows progress. The layout of the outdoor area limits the development of physical skills in the Early Years Foundation Stage. Pupils’ behaviour and attitudes to learning are good. Most pupils show great interest in their work and undertake assigned tasks with enthusiasm, especially when lessons are fun. Their enjoyment of school is shown by their above average attendance. Pupils feel secure in school and know how to keep themselves safe. The effectiveness of leadership and management is good. A ‘quest for quality’ and the promotion of pupils’ spiritual, moral, social and cultural development are at the heart of the school’s work. Morale is high and teamwork strong. Priorities for development are the right ones and are rigorously pursued. Systems for tracking pupils’ progress are fully established. The management of performance is good overall. However, the leadership of teaching is not focused enough on how well pupils learn in lessons. Although communication with parents and carers is good, a minority hold negative views.