St Catherine’s Roman Catholic School


Name St Catherine’s Roman Catholic School
Website http://www.stcatherinesbridport.dorset.sch.uk/
Ofsted Inspection Rating Requires improvement
Inspection Date 12 June 2019
Address Pymore Road, Bridport, Dorset, DT6 3TR
Phone Number 01308423568
Type Academy
Age Range 5-11
Religious Character Roman Catholic
Gender Mixed
Number of Pupils 185 (52% boys 48% girls)
Number of Pupils per Teacher 18.7
Academy Sponsor Plymouth Cast
Local Authority Dorset
Percentage Free School Meals 11.9%
Percentage English is Not First Language 3.8%

Information about this school

St Catherine’s Catholic Primary School is smaller than the average-sized primary school and is part of the Plymouth CAST. The trust was formed in April 2014. The work of the trust is overseen by a board of directors. The trust is responsible for one nursery, one first school, 32 primary schools and two secondary schools across six local authorities in the south-west region. The majority of pupils are of White British background. The proportion of pupils who speak English as an additional language is below the national average. The proportion of pupils who are known to be eligible for free school meals is below the national average. The proportion of pupils with SEND, including with an education, health and care plan, is above the national average. The school is designated as having a religious character and received its section 48 inspection in June 2018, when the school was graded as requiring improvement. The substantive headteacher was absent during the inspection. Interim leadership arrangements have been in place since December 2018. An acting headteacher from the trust has been in post since February 2019.

Summary of key findings for parents and pupils

This is a school that requires improvement Leaders and governors have not responded swiftly enough to the areas for improvement identified at the previous inspection. As a result, by the time pupils leave the school, their attainment in reading, writing and mathematics is below average. The curriculum for subjects other than English and mathematics is underdeveloped. Although pupils have access to a range of subjects, the quality of learning is variable. Leaders have begun plans to improve the curriculum, but it is too soon to judge the impact of their work. The quality of teaching is inconsistent. This has partially been affected by staffing turbulence. Nevertheless, teachers do not have high enough expectations of what pupils can achieve. This weakens the progress pupils make. A number of parents are not confident in the leadership of the school. They do not understand well enough why leaders have taken some of the decisions they have. A proportion of parents feel that leaders do not address their concerns. Pupils do not have a sufficiently good understanding of British values. The quality of the outdoor provision in the early years is not effective. This is having a negative impact on children’s opportunities to flourish across all areas of learning. Leaders and governors do not have a strong oversight of additional funding. As a result, they do not use funding effectively to make a difference to pupils’ achievement. Middle leaders are new to their roles. They are not yet having a positive impact in driving improvements in their areas of responsibility. The school has the following strengths The acting headteacher has stopped the decline in standards. She is rapidly bringing about change and improvements in the quality of leadership and teaching. Leaders promote pupils’ spiritual, moral, social and cultural development well. Pupils are safe in school and attend regularly. The interim academy board (IAB) has a secure understanding of the areas requiring immediate attention. It is making headway in improving pupils’ outcomes. The teaching of phonics is effective.