St Stephen Churchtown Academy


Name St Stephen Churchtown Academy
Website http://www.ststephenchurchtown.org.uk
Ofsted Inspection Rating Good
Inspection Date 18 September 2018
Address Creakavose, St Stephen, St Austell, Cornwall, PL26 7NZ
Phone Number 01726822568
Type Academy
Age Range 3-11
Religious Character Does Not Apply
Gender Mixed
Number of Pupils 294 (50% boys 50% girls)
Number of Pupils per Teacher 32.1
Academy Sponsor Aspire Academy Trust
Local Authority Cornwall
Percentage Free School Meals 16.9%
Percentage English is Not First Language 0.3%

Information about this school

The school was newly formed in September 2015. Its predecessor school, St Stephen Churchtown Primary School, was judged to be inadequate in February 2015. The school is part of Aspire Academy Trust, a multi-academy trust of 28 Cornish primary schools. The school is slightly larger than the average-sized primary school. Pupils are taught in mixed- and single-aged classes. The school’s early years provision includes a Nursery, a mixed Reception and Year 1 class, and a Reception class. The Nursery offers morning and afternoon sessions on a term-time basis for rising three- and four-year-olds. Virtually all the pupils attending the school are from a White British heritage. Over one third of the pupils are eligible for pupil premium funding. This is higher than the proportion found in most schools. The proportion of pupils who have SEN and/or disabilities is broadly in line with the national average.

Summary of key findings for parents and pupils

This is a good school Leaders have created a culture of aspiration and positive learning attitudes throughout the school. By the time pupils leave the school at the end of Year 6, they are well prepared for the next stage in their education. Regardless of their starting points, pupils make good progress. Staff training and subject support networks facilitated by the Aspire Academy Trust are leading to good and continually improving standards in reading, writing and mathematics. Many middle leaders are new to their role. They share senior leaders’ determination for improvement. Their work ensures that teachers have strong subject knowledge. Leaders make effective use of additional funding to ensure that disadvantaged pupils receive the support they need. Consequently, disadvantaged pupils make good progress. The curriculum promotes pupils’ spiritual, moral, social and cultural understanding well. It provides pupils with a breadth of knowledge in a range of subjects. However, it does not deepen pupils’ understanding in all subjects beyond mathematics, science and English. The quality of teaching is good and improving. Teachers receive precise guidance from leaders to help them to improve. The support for pupils who have special educational needs (SEN) and/or disabilities is highly effective. Carefully individualised support enables these pupils to make good progress. Children make good progress in the early years. Their development is strong in reading and number but less so in writing. Occasionally, activities are not precisely matched to children’s needs. Pupils and staff all model respectful and caring behaviour. There is a tone of care and courtesy throughout the school. Phonics is taught well. A higher proportion of pupils meet the standard in the phonics screening check than the national average. Despite this, pupils in key stage 1 do not apply their phonics skills to make correct choices when writing independently. Although highly positive about the school’s teaching and leadership, parents and carers would value greater communication about events in school.