Yesoiday Hatorah Boys Academy


Name Yesoiday Hatorah Boys Academy
Website http://www.yhs.org.uk/
Ofsted Inspection Rating Good
Inspection Date 08 July 2014
Address Sedgley Park Road, Prestwich, Manchester, Lancashire, M25 0JW
Phone Number 01617736364
Type Academy
Age Range 3-11
Religious Character Jewish
Gender Mixed
Number of Pupils 881 (47% boys 53% girls)
Number of Pupils per Teacher 27.2
Percentage Free School Meals 0.1%
Percentage English is Not First Language 4.4%

Information about this school

This school is much larger than the average sized primary school. The number of pupils on roll is rising rapidly. Extensive building work is taking place to increase the accommodation. The proportion of pupils from minority ethnic groups is well below average. The proportion of pupils who speak English as an additional language is broadly average Pupils are taught in separate gender groups throughout the school, including in the Early Years Foundation Stage. The proportion of pupils supported by the pupil premium is well below average. The pupil premium is additional funding for pupils known to be eligible for free school meals or looked after by the local authority. The proportion of disabled pupils and those who have special educational needs supported through school action is well above average. The proportion of pupils supported at school action plus or with a statement of special educational needs is also well above average. The school meets the government’s current floor standards, which are the minimum expectations for pupils’ attainment and progress in English and mathematics by the end of Year 6. There have been significant changes in staff, including senior leaders, because the school has grown rapidly. The school is a strategic partner to the Altrincham High Teaching School. Yesoiday Hatorah School converted to become an academy school on 1 April 2011. When its predecessor school, Yesoiday Hatorah School was last inspected by Ofsted, it was judged to be good. The headteacher is a Local Leader of Education and a member of a government primary education reference group.

Summary of key findings for parents and pupils

This is a good school. This increasingly popular and successful school is the heart of the local community. Children in the Early Years Foundation Stage achieve well from their different starting points. Pupils in all classes make good progress. By the end of Year 6, they reach standards that are broadly average, and rising, in reading, writing and mathematics. Teaching is typically good and sometimes outstanding. As a result, pupils are now making faster progress. The exceptionally positive relationships pupils have with staff help them to grow in confidence and mutual respect. Pupils’ behaviour is good and sometimes outstanding. Their attitudes to learning are very positive. They are proud of their school and feel safe. The charismatic and inspirational headteacher, ably assisted by the deputy headteacher, has successfully led improvements in leadership, the quality of teaching and the achievement of pupils. Governors are passionate about continually improving the school and provide rigorous challenge and support for senior leaders. Staff and governors work as one team for the benefit of all the pupils and their families. Morale is exceptionally high. The rich and broad range of subjects is well organised. The promotion of pupils’ spiritual, moral, social and cultural development is excellent. The school has wonderful relationships with parents and the wider community and receive much praise for their work. The school has excellent links with other schools, including those of other faiths. It is not yet an outstanding school because : Achievement is not as good in writing as in reading and mathematics. Occasionally, pupils, in particular the most able, are not always given more demanding work quickly enough. Teachers’ marking does not always help pupils to improve their work. Pupils do not use and extend their writing skills in a wide enough range of subjects. In the Early Years Foundation Stage, children do not make quick enough progress in developing their communication skills, particularly in writing.