Burrington Church of England Voluntary Aided Primary School


Name Burrington Church of England Voluntary Aided Primary School
Ofsted Inspection Rating Good
Inspection Date 18 March 2014
Address Burrington, Bristol, Somerset, BS40 7AD
Phone Number 01761462662
Type Primary
Age Range 3-11
Religious Character Church of England
Gender Mixed
Number of Pupils 70 (58% boys 42% girls)
Number of Pupils per Teacher 14.9
Local Authority North Somerset
Percentage Free School Meals 0%
Percentage English is Not First Language 1.4%

Information about this school

Burrington is much smaller than the average sized primary school. The majority of pupils come from White British backgrounds. The proportion of pupils supported by the pupil premium, which is additional funding given to the school by the government for certain groups, including those eligible for free school meals, is lower than average. The proportion of disabled pupils and those with special educational needs supported at school action is lower than the national average. The proportion of pupils supported at school action plus or with a statement of special educational needs is also lower than average. The school meets the government’s current floor standards, which set the minimum expectations for pupils’ attainment and progress.

Summary of key findings for parents and pupils

This is a good school. Pupils’ behaviour is exemplary. Pupils are safe, take very good care of each other and have very positive attitudes to their learning. Pupils make very good progress in English. Rates of progress in mathematics are improving. Children make a secure start in the Early Years Foundation Stage. By the end of Year 6 pupils attain higher than average standards in English and mathematics. Teaching is consistently good. Teachers ensure pupils learn the skills they need and challenge them to do their best. The headteacher is very effective. She is well supported by staff and governors. Working together they have successfully brought about numerous improvements at the school. The governing body holds the school to account for the outcomes pupils achieve. Governors understand the school’s strengths and weaknesses. It is not yet an outstanding school because: Pupils do not make the same rate of progress in mathematics as they do in reading and writing. Teachers’ marking of mathematics does not focus enough on enabling pupils to make good progress. Leaders have not ensured that the teaching of mathematics is as good as the teaching of English.