Dinglewell Infant School


Name Dinglewell Infant School
Website http://www.dinglewellinfants.org
Ofsted Inspection Rating Good
Inspection Date 26 November 2013
Address Dinglewell, Hucclecote, Gloucester, Gloucestershire, GL3 3HS
Phone Number 01452619154
Type Primary
Age Range 5-7
Religious Character Does Not Apply
Gender Mixed
Number of Pupils 270 (52% boys 48% girls)
Number of Pupils per Teacher 24.0
Percentage Free School Meals 4.8%
Percentage English is Not First Language 3%

Information about this school

This is an average-sized infant school. The headteacher was appointed in September 2013 and was an internal candidate for the post. The proportion of disabled pupils and those who have special educational needs who are supported by school action is equal to the national average. The proportion supported at school action plus or with a statement of special educational needs is below average. The proportion of pupils known to be eligible for the pupil premium is well below average. This is additional funding provided to schools by the government to support pupils eligible for free school meals, children in the care of the local authority and children with a parent or carer in the armed services. The percentage of pupils from minority ethnic groups is well below average. The percentage of pupils who speak English as an additional language is well below average. The school has a before-school club facility which runs from the school site. This is managed by the governing body.

Summary of key findings for parents and pupils

This is a good school. Teachers plan and teach lessons that are consistently good. The use of questioning and the good climate for learning are strong features of the best teaching in the school. The recently appointed headteacher and governing body are leading the school very well. The governors effectively challenge school leaders and support the school. Pupils’ behaviour in and around the school is good. Pupils are proud of their school and say that they feel safe there. They have good attitudes to learning. Disabled pupils, those who have special educational needs and those supported by the pupil premium funding make the same good progress as other pupils. Parents are positive about the school. They praise the staff’s commitments to keeping their children safe and happy at school. It is not yet an outstanding school because : There is not enough outstanding teaching. At times, work is not challenging enough for some pupils, particularly the most able pupils, and occasionally too difficult for others. The quality of marking in pupils’ books does not always help pupils to improve their work. Standards in mathematics and writing are not yet as high as in reading.