Edenfield Church of England Primary School


Name Edenfield Church of England Primary School
Ofsted Inspection Rating Good
Inspection Date 24 April 2014
Address Market Street, Edenfield, Bury, Lancashire, BL0 0HL
Phone Number 01706823608
Type Primary
Age Range 4-11
Religious Character Church of England
Gender Mixed
Number of Pupils 188 (47% boys 53% girls)
Number of Pupils per Teacher 26.9
Percentage Free School Meals 3.2%
Percentage English is Not First Language 1.6%

Information about this school

This is a smaller than average-sized primary school. Only a very small proportion of pupils are supported by the pupil premium. The pupil premium is additional government funding allocated to the school for pupils known to be eligible for free school meals and those looked after by the local authority. The proportion of disabled pupils and those with special educational needs supported through school action is below average. The proportion of pupils supported at school action plus or with a statement of special educational needs is below average. A lower than average proportion of pupils speaks English as an additional language. Pupils are mainly classified as White British. The school provides before- and after-school care sessions on the premises. The headteacher is retiring at the end of the summer term 2014. The school has appointed a new headteacher, who is currently working as an acting headteacher, in partnership with the current headteacher. In 2013, the school met the current government floor standards, which are the minimum expectations for pupils’ attainment and progress.

Summary of key findings for parents and pupils

This is a good school. Pupils make good progress from their starting points so that they reach above average standards by the end of Year 6 in reading, writing and mathematics. Teaching is good and some is outstanding. Lessons are well planned and many include a rich variety of activities. Teaching and learning in the Reception class are good so that children benefit from a strong start in their development. The school’s leaders, well supported by governors, have been successful in raising achievement. They are taking effective actions to bring about further improvements. Disabled pupils and those with special educational needs make good progress. Individual pupils’ needs are very well understood and skilled support is quickly put in place when necessary. Attendance is high. Pupils of all ages enjoy coming to school and like the topics they study. Pupils’ behaviour is good owing to the very positive relationships they have with staff who they know will look after them. They feel safe in school. The school’s curriculum is rich, vibrant and exciting. The spiritual, moral, social and cultural education of the pupils is a strength of the school and underpins everything it does. It is not yet an outstanding school because : Sometimes, information about pupils’ progress is not used well enough to provide tasks that are hard enough for them to make faster progress, particularly for the most-able pupils. Pupils are not always challenged to respond to teachers’ marking which sometimes means they repeatedly make the same mistakes. Leaders of subjects, other than English and mathematics, are not involved enough in checking the information on pupils’ progress regularly to identify quickly where further improvements can be made.