Oak Grove College


Name Oak Grove College
Website http://oakgrovecollege.org.uk
Ofsted Inspection Rating Good
Inspection Date 11 December 2014
Address The Boulevard, Worthing, West Sussex, BN13 1JX
Phone Number 01903708870
Type Special
Age Range 11-19
Religious Character Does Not Apply
Gender Mixed
Number of Pupils 245
Local Authority 938
Percentage Free School Meals 36%
Percentage English is Not First Language 3.7%
Persisitent Absence 34%
Pupils with SEN Support 1.2%
Catchment Area Information Available No, we only have catchment area data for schools in England
Last Distance Offered Information Available No

Information about this school

Oak Grove College is a community special school for students aged 11 to 19 who have a range of special educational needs, including moderate learning difficulties, severe learning difficulties or autistic spectrum disorders. A small number have profound and multiple learning difficulties. Most students are White British. Students are taught in groups that are based on their needs. The proportion of disadvantaged students who are known to be eligible for the pupil premium (additional funding for students known to be entitled to free school meals and those in care) is above average. Sixty-seven students aged 16 to 19 attend the sixth form. Those who follow the one-year transition course also attend Northbroook College, Worthing or Chichester College, Pulborough for two days each week. Other students choose a two- or three-year course at Oak Grove. Occasionally, students follow subjects at Durrington High School, Worthing High School or Worthing College, local secondary mainstream schools. Since the previous inspection, the college has become part of a federation with Palatine and Cornfield special schools in West Sussex. There is a management committee for the college, which is chaired jointly by two governors. The college also works in partnership with the Durrington Family Group, consisting of approximately 13 local primary, secondary and special schools. The college has specialist arts college status.

Summary of key findings for parents and students

This is a good school. Students make good progress in many different subjects. They are very well prepared for their next stage of education, work or training. Students’ progress in English and mathematics has improved considerably since the last inspection. Students make outstanding progress in some subjects, including art, music, physical education and work-related subjects such as gardening. Teaching is typically good and sometimes outstanding. Teachers’ subject knowledge is good or better. They know their students well. Students behave well. They try hard and do their best. They get on well together and say they feel safe and happy in school. Sixth form provision is outstanding. The wide choice of subjects offered is tailored to each individual’s needs. This means that students make outstanding progress and are very well prepared for the next stage of their lives. The college is well led and managed by the headteacher. His vision for high standards is shared by all staff and supported well by experienced leaders and managers. As a result, many aspects of the college, including teaching, achievement and the sixth form, have improved. Governors regularly visit the school and hold leaders to account. They have a good understanding of all aspects of the college’s work, including teaching and achievement. It is not yet an outstanding school because : Some teachers give written feedback to students that helps them to improve their work. This is not yet consistent across the college. In Key Stage 3, teachers sometimes assess the English work of a few of the more able students too generously. This means that the activities they plan do not always help these students to make even faster progress. New leaders and managers regularly check the school’s performance. They do not yet use the information well enough to plan further improvements.