Oakdale Primary School


Name Oakdale Primary School
Website http://www.oakdale.peterborough.sch.uk
Ofsted Inspection Rating Good
Inspection Date 29 September 2011
Address Oakdale Avenue, Stanground, Peterborough, Cambridgeshire, PE2 8TD
Phone Number 01733566237
Type Primary
Age Range 5-11
Religious Character Does not apply
Gender Mixed
Number of Pupils 228 (54% boys 46% girls)
Number of Pupils per Teacher 22.4
Local Authority Peterborough
Percentage Free School Meals 11.8%
Percentage English is Not First Language 18.9%
Persisitent Absence 5.4%
Pupils with SEN Support 8.8%
Catchment Area Information Available Yes, our catchment area data is FREE
Last Distance Offered Information Available No

Information about the school

Oakdale is smaller than the average primary school. The percentage of pupils from minority ethnic groups is below average. Of these, a significant minority have Italian heritage. The proportion of pupils known to be eligible for free school meals is below average. The proportion of pupils with special educational needs and/or disabilities is below average, but the proportion of those with a statement of special educational needs is average. A new headteacher took up post in September 2011. The school has a wide range of awards including Investors in People, the Information Technology Mark and Artsmark Gold.

Main findings

Oakdale is a good school. The new headteacher has won the support and respect of the whole school community through her collaborative leadership style and astute early assessment of what the school does well and where it could improve. Changes she has introduced have been broadly welcomed and are making a difference. For example, measures to secure the school site and monitor access to the building have created a safe environment for pupils and staff alike. She leads a strong team, with well-established systems to monitor the quality of teaching and learning and the breadth of the curriculum. While all subject leaders have the opportunity to observe lessons on a regular basis, there is occasional inconsistency in how well this is done, and how efficiently time is allocated to the task. Nonetheless, leaders and managers have been successful in improving teaching, so that it is now consistently good. Pupils make good progress from starting points that are often below those expected for their age, and those with special educational needs and/or disabilities do outstandingly well. This is because the school identifies early any pupils requiring extra help and provides support that is targeted precisely to their needs. Close monitoring of their progress ensures that planning can be adapted to respond to any changes in their performance. Pupils’ attainment is broadly average but improving, especially in reading. In writing, while most pupils make good progress, some more-able pupils do not reach the higher levels of attainment because they do not have sufficient opportunity to practise writing at length. Teachers have identified these pupils and are monitoring their progress closely. The school’s learning environment is very rich, with outstanding displays of artwork making the classrooms and public areas highly attractive. The curriculum interests and engages pupils well, and is enriched by a good range of visits and visitors. Teachers have good subject knowledge and probe pupils’ understanding with searching questions. They use information and communication technology well to bring learning alive. Their use of assessment is satisfactory, but some pupils have targets that are too general and there is unevenness in the extent to which marking and other guidance shows pupils how to reach them. The new headteacher has introduced a new marking policy which is beginning to tackle these shortcomings. Outstanding pastoral care enables pupils whose circumstances may make them vulnerable to overcome any barriers to learning successfully. The school promotes attendance well, keeping it above average levels. Pupils make a good contribution to the school and wider community, taking on numerous responsibilities, for example as newly-appointed house captains. They have an excellent understanding of how to stay safe, and say they have not experienced bullying at the school. They take plenty of exercise and many make healthy choices. However, a small minority of pupils do not choose healthy snacks at playtimes. The good progress made since the school’s previous inspection, with improvements in teaching and rising standards, combined with the considerable impact of the new headteacher and clear and effective self-evaluation, points to a good capacity for further improvement.