Ormskirk St Anne’s Catholic Primary School

About Ormskirk St Anne’s Catholic Primary School Browse Features

Ormskirk St Anne’s Catholic Primary School


Name Ormskirk St Anne’s Catholic Primary School
Website http://www.st-annesrc.lancs.sch.uk
Ofsted Inspection Rating Good
Inspection Date 10 December 2019
Address Aughton Street, Townend, Ormskirk, Lancashire, L39 3LQ
Phone Number 01695574697
Type Primary
Age Range 4-11
Religious Character Roman Catholic
Gender Mixed
Number of Pupils 375
Number of Pupils per Teacher 22.0
Local Authority 888
Percentage Free School Meals 3.2%
Percentage English is Not First Language 2.1%
Persisitent Absence 2.7%
Pupils with SEN Support 8.8%
Catchment Area Information Available Yes, our catchment area data is FREE
Last Distance Offered Information Available No

What is it like to attend this school?

Over the past two years, this school has gone from strength to strength. The headteacher has succeeded in getting all colleagues to sign up to his ambitious vision for the school. Together, they have made dramatic improvements to the range of subjects taught, the environment, the resources and the spirit of the school. Everyone wants the very best for the pupils. Parents, carers and pupils are full of praise for the way that the school has been turned around.

Pupils are extremely well behaved. They get on very well with each other and with adults. Bullying is very rare. If it does happen, it is dealt with very quickly. Pupils seldom miss a day of school. They feel happy, safe and well cared for. Pupils take full advantage of the increasing range of sporting, musical and artistic activities available to them.

The achievement of pupils in the early years and key stage 1 has clearly improved. At key stage 2, writing standards are high. Standards in reading and in grammar, punctuation and spelling are not as high as they should be. Pupils enjoy reading but the books that they read tend to be limited to fiction by a small number of authors.

What does the school do well and what does it need to do better?

The headteacher is a strong role model for his colleagues. He ensures that all staff contribute to the leadership of the school. He trusts them to get on with their work but also holds them to account. The staff value the opportunities for their professional development and the care that senior leaders take over their well-being.

The governors know the school well. They have high ambitions for the staff and pupils. They provide leaders with the right balance of support and challenge.

Leaders have planned a broad and rich curriculum that meets the demands of the national curriculum. Teachers are well trained and have good subject knowledge. They plan the work carefully, so that pupils learn more and remember more. In geography, for example, pupils use their understanding of environmental issues to discuss whether we should build on green belts. In art, they draw on experiments with a range of techniques to develop large-scale paintings. In French, they apply their knowledge of grammar to writing short sentences in the language. In history, they use their mental arithmetic skills to work out the number of centuries between one date and another.

The curriculum meets the needs of disadvantaged pupils and pupils with special educational needs and/or disabilities (SEND). They take a full part in all lessons.

The teaching of reading is central to the school’s work. From the moment they arrive, children begin to read letter sounds. They quickly move on to reading and writing simple words and sentences. The books pupils read are carefully matched to the words they are learning. Those who are falling behind receive additional supportto help them catch up.

Teachers read regularly to the pupils, making sure that they bring the stories to life. Pupils read a lot at home. The books they read are mainly fiction books by a small number of authors. They read a limited amount of poetry and cannot remember the poems they have read. The library is growing but includes comparatively few non-fiction books.

Pupils have a wide range of opportunities for writing. However, in subjects other than English, they pay too little attention to grammar, punctuation and spelling.

Leaders are rightly proud of the very high standards of behaviour in the school. Pupils learn to respect a variety of faiths and lifestyles. They make a valuable contribution to the life of the school in roles such as school leaders. They contribute to the life of the local community through their charitable work. They are also very conscious of their responsibility for helping to make the world a better place.

The school has been successful in extending its early years provision to include a Nursery class. Staff are well qualified and experienced and keep themselves up to date with the most recent developments. They plan the work carefully to ensure that children build up their skills and knowledge in a logical way. This is particularly the case where the development of writing is concerned. Staff work closely with parents to check regularly on how well each child is doing and to give extra help where this is needed. The children settle in quickly, behave well and clearly enjoy their time in this safe, caring environment.

Safeguarding

The arrangements for safeguarding are effective.

All staff and almost all parents are confident that children are safe at the school. They learn how to keep themselves safe near roads and railways and when using the internet and social media. They learn to swim, so that they are safe in and near water. The school checks carefully on the suitability of adults to work with children. Staff and governors receive regular training on safeguarding. They know how to identify possible signs of abuse and what to do if they have any concerns about the welfare of a pupil.

What does the school need to do to improve?

(Information for the school and appropriate authority)

Pupils do not consistently pay attention to spelling, punctuation and grammar in subjects other than English. As a result, this aspect of their work is not as well developed as it should be. There is a need to sharpen the focus on grammar, punctuation and spelling across all subjects, so that writing standards rise further. . The improvements in reading lower down the school have not yet worked throughto key stage 2. As a result, the progress made by Year 6 pupils in the national reading tests was below average in 2019. The school should build on the good practice in the early years and key stage 1 to ensure that, by the time they leave school, pupils’ reading attainment is at least in line with that found nationally. . The range of books that pupils read tends to be restricted to fiction by a small number of authors. As a result, the genres with which they are familiar are limited. There is a need to introduce pupils to a wider range of literature, including poetry in addition to non-fiction texts, in order to further develop pupils’ love of reading.