Warden Hill Junior School


Name Warden Hill Junior School
Website http://www.wardenhill-jun.luton.gov.uk
Ofsted Inspection Rating Good
Inspection Date 25 March 2014
Address Birdsfoot Lane, Luton, Bedfordshire, LU3 2DN
Phone Number 01582591386
Type Primary
Age Range 7-11
Religious Character Does Not Apply
Gender Mixed
Number of Pupils 462 (53% boys 47% girls)
Number of Pupils per Teacher 22.6
Percentage Free School Meals 9.5%
Percentage English is Not First Language 24.7%

Information about this school

Warden Hill Junior School is larger than the average-sized primary school. There are three classes in each year group from Year 3 to Year 6. Around half of pupils come from a White British background and the remainder from a wide range of different ethnic backgrounds. Fewer pupils than average speak English as an additional language. The proportion of pupils supported by the pupil premium (the extra government funding for pupils known to be eligible for free school meals, in local authority care or from a family with a parent in the armed forces) is average. The proportion of disabled pupils and those who have special educational needs supported through school action is similar to the national average. The proportion supported through school action plus or with a statement of special educational needs is also average. The school meets the government’s current floor standards, which set the minimum expectations for pupils’ attainment and progress. The school, in partnership with the neighbouring infant school, runs a breakfast club. Off-site alternative provision is available for pupils with behavioural problems.

Summary of key findings for parents and pupils

This is a good school. Warden Hill Junior School is a safe and secure place. Pupils are happy to come to school. They like their teachers, enjoy their school work and feel valued. The school is well organised and managed. The senior leadership team works continually to improve the quality of teaching and pupils’ achievement. Parents are fully involved in school life. The well-informed governing body supports the school effectively. They ensure that finances are used to the best advantage of pupils and hold the school to account for its actions. Pupils achieve well. They make good progress in all subjects and, by the end of Key Stage 2, reach standards above the national averages in English and mathematics. Teaching is usually good and some is outstanding. Teachers have established good relationships with pupils and manage their classes well. They are enthusiastic and plan lessons that interest pupils. Homework is used effectively to complement work in class. Pupils behave well and get along with one another with little friction. The school promotes pupils’ spiritual, moral, social and cultural development well. It is not yet an outstanding school because : Pupils achieve less well in writing than they do in reading and mathematics. Teachers’ plans do not always take sufficient account of what pupils know and can do. Teachers’ questions do not always extend pupils’ thinking. The marking of pupils’ written work is not consistent.